Around Cincy

Cincinnati is Ohio's third largest city and the largest metro region, and lies on the north bank of the Ohio River in Southwest Ohio in the United States of America. Known as the "Queen City" or "Queen of the West," Cincinnati was the only 19th century American city that left a favorable impression on the then 30-year-old English author Charles Dickens. “Cincinnati is a beautiful city; cheerful, thriving, and animated,” Dickens wrote in “American Notes.” “I have not often seen a place that commends itself so favorably and pleasantly to a stranger at the first glance as this does: with its clean houses of red and white, its well-paved roads, and foot-ways of bright tile. Nor does it become less prepossessing on a closer acquaintance.”

Cincinnati is distinct amongst Midwestern cities. Its culture is a mixture of the Northeast, Old South, Midwest, and Appalachia blended with a strong German-Catholic heritage. It was one of the United States' early boomtowns, and the Over-the-Rhine neighborhood is the largest National Historic District in the country. Today, it's part of a fast-growing metro area, and home to a remarkable blend of industry and architecture. Downtown Cincinnati is surrounded by picturesque foothills that add a beautiful backdrop to the Queen City and its legendary skyline – celebrated in the opening credits of television show WKRP in Cincinnati.

 

 

Newport On The Levee

Newport on the Levee is a multi-level urban retail entertainment center located on the south bank of the Ohio River in Newport, Kentucky directly across from Downtown Cincinnati. Kick back, relax and enjoy the many experiences at Newport on the Levee. Take in an afternoon movie at AMC Newport, have arcade fun at GameWorks or satisfy your taste buds at any one of the delicious dining venues. Bowl your best game at Axis Alley, dive into on-going excitement at the Newport Aquarium, indulge your sweet tooth at Cold Stone Creamery, laugh at stand-up comedy at the Funny Bone Comedy Club and watch the gorgeous sunset over the Cincinnati skyline. All of this and more is waiting for you at Newport on the Levee.


Go to top

The Banks

The Banks is the most exciting project at the Downtown Cincinnati riverfront since the completion of the National Underground Freedom Center and sports stadiums. It is part and parcel of a Riverfront strategic development plan that was originally unveiled in the 1990’s. The Banks has long been envisioned as a marquee, mixed use development that incorporates residential units, office space, dining, leisure and entertainment venues.

The Banks is the final piece of the puzzle. It is the piece that links the entertainment venues, and connects the Central Business District to the waterfront via a spectacular riverfront park. The Banks is the linchpin to a 24/7 vibrant waterfront, making it truly a live, work, play neighborhood.


Go to top

Newport Aquarium

Newport Aquarium showcases thousands of animals from around the world in a million gallons of water, including the enormously popular “Sweet Pea” and “Scooter,” the stars of the first shark ray breeding program in the world.
This state-of-the-art facility was named the No. 1 aquarium in the 2012 Readers’ Choice Travel Awards from 10Best.com; the Best Rainy Day Outing in 2006 in Cincinnati Family Magazine; and the Best Aquarium in the Midwest in the Zagat Survey’s U.S. Family Travel Guide in 2004.
Newport Aquarium is an accredited member of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums  which sets the rigorous professional standards for animal welfare, veterinary care, wildlife conservation, research, education, staffing and safety.
The Aquarium is owned by Herschend Family Entertainment Corp. a privately held company devoted to bringing families closer together and creating memories worth repeating.
The Aquarium is open to the public 365 days a year. It is located only two minutes from downtown Cincinnati at Newport on the Levee.


Go to top

Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden

The Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden is the second oldest zoo in the United States. It opened in 1875, just 14 months after the Philadelphia Zoo on July 1, 1874. The Reptile House is the oldest zoo building in the United States, dating from 1875.

The Cincinnati Zoo is located in the Avondale neighborhood of Cincinnati . It was founded on 65.4 acres (26.5 ha) in the middle of the city, and since then it has acquired some of the surrounding blocks and several reserves in Cincinnati's outer suburbs. The zoo conducts breeding programs, and was the first to successfully breed California sea lions. The zoo also has other breeding programs including South African cheetahs, Sumatran rhinoceros, Indochinese tigers, Malayan tigers, western lowland gorillas, pottos, and Masai giraffes. The Cincinnati Zoo was the home of Martha, the last living passenger pigeon, which died there in 1914. It was also home to the last living Carolina parakeet in 1918.

The zoo is an accredited member of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), and a member of the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums (WAZA).


Go to top

Krohn Conservatory

The Irwin M. Krohn Conservatory is a conservatory located in Eden Park within Cincinnati, Ohio in the United States. The conservatory was completed in 1933, replacing smaller greenhouses that had stood in Eden Park since 1894. Originally known only as the Eden Park Greenhouse, in 1937 it was renamed in honor of Irwin M. Krohn, who served as Board of Park Commissioner from 1912 to 1948. The architect firm Rapp & Meacham designed the conservatory in the Art Deco style, in the form of a Gothic arch.


Go to top

Cincinnati Reds - Great American Ballpark

Located on the winding banks of the Ohio River in downtown Cincinnati, Great American Ball Park serves as the home of the Cincinnati Reds, baseball's first professional franchise.


Go to top

Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame and Museum

An intereactive family entertainment venue showcasing the world's largest collection of Cincinnati Reds memorabilia and artifacts; theater modeled after Crosley Field bleachers.


Go to top

Paul Brown Stadium and Bengals Pro Shop

Paul Brown Stadium is the home venue of the Cincinnati Bengals of the National Football League. It opened on August 19, 2000. The stadium was named after Bengals' founder Paul Brown. The stadium is located on approximately 22 acres (8.9 ha) of land and has a listed capacity of 65,535. Paul Brown Stadium is nicknamed "The Jungle", an allusion not only to the namesake Bengal tiger's natural habitat, but also the Guns N' Roses song "Welcome to the Jungle".

Paul Brown Stadium also houses the Bengals' administrative offices and training and practice facilities. The game field in Paul Brown Stadium is UBU Sports Speed S5-M synthetic turf system. There are three smaller practice fields nearby. Two are sodded with natural grass while the third is equipped with AstroTurf.

On-site retail merchandise sales are available in the Bengals pro shop, located on the plaza level on the north end of the stadium.


Go to top

National Underground Railroad Freedom Center

Opened on the banks of the Ohio River in Cincinnati in 2004, the mission of the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center is to reveal stories of freedom’s heroes, from the era of the Underground Railroad to contemporary times, challenging and inspiring everyone to take courageous steps of freedom today. A history museum with more than 100,000 visitors annually, it serves to inspire modern abolition through connecting the lessons of the Underground Railroad with today’s freedom fighters.  The center is also a convener of dialogue on freedom and human rights.


Go to top

Cincinnati Museum Center

Cincinnati Museum Center is a one-of-a-kind, multi-museum complex housed in Union Terminal, a historic Art Deco train station and National Historic Landmark. Museum Center's major offerings at Union Terminal include the Cincinnati History Museum, the Cincinnati History Library and Archives, the Duke Energy Children's Museum, the Museum of Natural History & Science and the Robert D. Lindner Family OMNIMAX® Theater. Museum Center is the largest cultural institution in the city of Cincinnati, with more than 1.4 million visitors per year. Our permanent and temporary exhibits are supported and complemented by a state-of-the-art collections and research facility, the Geier Collections & Research Center, educational programs, professional development programs for teachers, day and overnight camps, public lectures and programs, tours of historic sites and community-wide cultural events. Museum Center’s collection encompass more than 1.8 million artifacts, art works and archives and is incorporated into our exhibition, research and education programs.


Go to top

Cincinnati Art Museum

Located in scenic Eden Park, the Cincinnati Art Museum features an unparalleled art collection of more than 65,000 works spanning 6,000 years. In addition to displaying its own broad collection, the Art Museum also hosts several national and international traveling exhibitions each year.

Visitors can enjoy the exhibitions or participate in the Art Museum’s wide range of art-related programs, activities and special events. General admission is always free for all, plus Art Museum members receive additional benefits.

The Art Museum is open six days a week, making greater Cincinnati’s most treasured cultural asset accessible to everyone.


Go to top

Cincinnati Contemporary Arts Center

The Contemporary Arts Center (CAC)—one of the first contemporary art institutions in the United States—is a pioneering contemporary art museum located in Cincinnati, Ohio. The CAC is a non-collecting museum that focuses on new developments in painting, sculpture, photography, architecture, performance art and new media. Remaining committed to programming that reflects "the art of the last five minutes," the CAC has displayed the works of many now-famous artists early in their careers, including Andy Warhol.


Go to top

Carew Tower

Carew Tower is a 49-story, 574-foot (175 m) building completed in 1930 in the heart of downtown, overlooking the Ohio River waterfront. It is the second-tallest building in the city and was added to the register of National Historic Landmarks on April 19, 1994. It is named for Joseph T. Carew, proprietor of the Mabley & Carew department store chain, which had previously operated on the site since 1877.

The complex contains the Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza (formerly Omni Netherland Plaza), which is described as a fine example of French Art Deco architecture, and was used as the model for the Empire State Building in New York City. The hotel's Hall of Mirrors banquet room was inspired by the Hall of Mirrors at the Palace of Versailles

Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza is a member of Historic Hotels of America, the official program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.[9]

The tower remained the city's tallest until the completion of the Great American Tower at Queen City Square on July 13, 2010, rising 86 ft (26 m) higher than Carew Tower, making Cincinnati one of the last major American cities whose tallest building had been constructed prior to World War II.


Go to top

Fountain Square

An Indian mound stood at the present site of Fountain Square when the first white settlers arrived.

Fountain Square has been the symbolic center of Cincinnati since 1871. The square, which replaced a butcher's market, was a gift from Henry Probasco in memory of Tyler Davidson. Probasco traveled to Munich and commissioned a bronze allegorical fountain from Ferdinand von Miller named The Genius of Water. Originally, the square occupied a large island in the middle of Fifth Street with buildings to the north and south, much like nearby Piatt Park. A 1971 renovation of the square included slightly moving and re-orienting the fountain to the west, and enlarging the plaza by removing the original westbound portion of 5th Street and demolishing buildings to the north. It is used for lunch-breaks, rallies, and other gatherings.

The Fountain can be seen in the opening credits on WKRP in Cincinnati

In the early 2000s, the square was completely renovated and re-designed by 3cdc and BHDP Architecture (consulted by Cooper, Robertson & Partners and OLIN) to attract more visitors to the city, and to serve as a cultural/recreational hub for the city. In addition to the renovations, many buildings in and around the Fountain Square district are currently being renovated and redesigned. The Fountain itself was completely restored and moved to a more central location in the square.


Go to top

Findlay Market

Findlay Market is Ohio's oldest continuously operated public market and one of Cincinnati's most cherished institutions, welcoming more than a million visitors a year.  Located just blocks from downtown in Over-the-Rhine, a dense historic neighborhood rich in 19th century architecture, Findlay Market remains the bustling center of farm fresh, locally sourced, artisanal and specialty foods. Open Tuesday through Sunday year round, Findlay Market is home to more than 40 indoor merchants selling meat, fish, poultry, produce, flowers, cheese, deli, and ethnic foods. On weekends from April through November the Market also hosts a thriving farmers market, dozens of outdoor vendors, numerous street performers, and lots of special events.


Go to top

Jungle Jim's International Market

Jungle Jim’s International Market is more than a grocery store, it’s a destination! With more than 200,000 square feet of shopping space in each of our stores, there are over 150,000 products from which to choose.

In addition to all the grocery items, you’ll find store tours, food demonstrations and lots of fun and attractions for the whole family.

Our stores also offer more gift shops, boutiques, restaurants and conveniences than any other mega store in the region. Stop in for an hour or make a day of it. However you do it, shopping at Jungle Jim’s is an experience you won’t forget!


Go to top

Coney Island

Located on the banks of the Ohio River, Coney Island offers a fun family outing without all the cost and utter exhaustion of a day at a larger, more frenetic amusement park. Sunlite Pool at Coney is billed as the world's largest recirculating pool, and parents of small children will like the fact that the shallow section is huge and lifeguards are in abundance.


Go to top

Cedar Fair Kings Island

Kings Island is the largest amusement park and water park in the Midwest. And for good reason. Start with the thrill rides. The 5,282-foot, 80-mph Diamondback roller coaster. The Beast that travels across a 35-acre site at 65 mph. WindSeeker, which takes you 301 feet above the park for an unparalleled swing ride. Then there’s the Vortex, where you go through two vertical loops, one corkscrew, one boomerang turn and a 360-degree helix. Those alone are probably enough to make us the largest amusement park in the Midwest. Then there’s the kid-centric fun like Planet Snoopy. There’s also Dinosaurs Alive!– 60 life-sized dinos spread across seven acres of Jurassic thrills. Then there’s what completes our being the largest amusement park and water park in the Midwest – Soak City. Huge slides, wave pools and rushing rivers. It’s what makes us the largest amusement park and water park in the Midwest.


Go to top

The Beach Waterpark

The Beach Waterpark has been open since 1985, and boasts a long of being a leader in the entertainment and waterpark industry. This unique, tropical park offers a lush get-a-way that is close to home and features 22 slides and entertainment attractions for kids of all ages.

“Must see’s” include a heated wave pool and interactive kids play area with multiple slides and a 600-gallon dumping bucket. New attractions abound with all your favorite thrill and chill rides now featuring new designs and color schemes.


Go to top